PFM Fleet Service Truck

PFM Fleet Service - Ford Transit Specialists

As Ford Transit specialists with dealer level diagnostics we are able to quickly, accurately, and safely get your fleet back out on the road. Most Ford Transit repairs can be performed on site at your location with our mobile fleet service including oil changes, brakes and tires, saving time and money. 

 

From serving Amazon DSPs to small family owned businesses and everything in-between, we know a thing or two about Ford Transits. From oil changes to transmission replacement we make sure your Ford Transit fleet is safe and reliable. 

Give us a call at 614-377-2230 or email us at Service@PFMFleetService.com

Ford Transits In Lot PFM Fleet Service
Ford Transit Repair PFM Fleet Service

FORD TRANSIT FAQ - COMMON PROBLEMS AND CORRECTIONS

Ford Transit - Heat Doesn't Work

This is sometimes also associated with the driver reporting a sweet smell. 

 

Check your coolant level, it is likely low. Most often we find that lack of heat complaints or intermittent heat are caused by low coolant due to a leak. Transit cooling systems operate at 21 psi, higher than most cooling systems which are around 16-17psi. This makes Transit cooling system more prone to leaks.

 

Common coolant leak points on Ford Transits

 

  1. Radiator - Leaks are common where the radiator core crimps to the plastic tanks

  2. Coolant Degas Bottle - The bottle that contains the radiator cap frequently leaks around the molded seam

  3. Water Pump - Leakage from the water pump weep hole due to a failed shaft seal

  4. Hoses - Especially on high mileage vehicles. Typically around 200,000 miles we begin seeing hose ruptures become more frequent. 

Ford Transit - Overheating

First, check your coolant level, it is likely low. Most often we find overheating is caused by low coolant due to a leak. Transit cooling systems operate at 21 psi, higher than most cooling systems which are around 16-17psi. This makes Transit cooling system more prone to leaks.

 

Common coolant leak points on Ford Transits 

 

  1. Radiator - Leaks are common where the radiator core crimps to the plastic tanks

  2. Coolant Degas Bottle - The bottle that contains the radiator cap frequently leaks around the molded seam

  3. Water Pump - Leakage from the water pump weep hole due to a failed shaft seal

  4. Hoses - Especially on high mileage vehicles. Typically around 200,000 miles we begin seeing hose ruptures become more frequent. 

 

 

If the coolant level is full, check to see if the cooling fans operate. If the vehicle is overheating, they should be on high. We have seen cooling fan failure, typically around the 80,000+ mile mark. Especially on vehicles driven in dusty conditions contaminating the fan motors. 

Ford Transit - Check Engine Light

This can be difficult to diagnose without the aid of diagnostic software. Your local parts store can typically scan your Ford Transit for diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs). While these won't tell you exactly what's wrong, they can help narrow it down. Here are some DTCs we see frequently and what commonly fixes the concern. 

 

  • P051B - Replace Crankcase Pressure Sensor (CPS)

  • P1450, P2195 and/or P2197 - Replace Canister Purge Solenoid (CANP)

  • P0230 - Replace Fuel Pump Relay

  • P0627 (Engine cranks but does not start) - Failed fuel pump control module (FPCM)

  •  P00BD, P1247, P1548, P061B, P2195, P2198, P2196, P2197, P0171, P0172, P0174, P0175, P0131 and/or P162F (2015-2018 Transits) - Check PCM connectors for water intrusion. If water is present inside of connectors TSB 19-2091 will need to be performed. Click HERE to view TSB.

  • Oxygen sensor codes - We have found that replacing the oxygen sensors repairs any oxygen sensor based DTC 99% of the time. PCM and wiring issues have been rare. 

Ford Transit - Uneven Tire Wear

  •  Lack of tire rotations. Tires should be rotated every 5,000 miles. 

  • Vehicle out of alignment. We recommend yearly alignments to keep your Transit driving straight and your tires wearing evenly.

  • Tire pressure - Too low of pressure causes both outer edges to wear. Too high of pressure causes only the center section of tire to wear.  

  • Excessive play in front ball joints. We frequently see Transits develop lower ball joint play around 100,000 miles. This causes the alignment to go out of specification and uneven tire wear begins. This requires replacement of the lower ball joints. 

Ford Transit - Squealing Brakes

  • Transits LOVE to eat rear brakes. A combination of design and heavy payloads lead to rapid rear brake wear. We typically see Transits requiring rear brake replacement between 20,000 and 40,000 miles. Sometimes sooner. Front brakes generally last around 75,000 miles. 

 

A word of warning about Ford Transit brakes. These are not your standard brakes where you can simply slap a set of rotors and pads on. These vehicles require removal of the front hubs and rear axles to perform a brake service. These bolts are torque to yield (one time use only) and can fail if reused. This can lead to the wheel(s) falling completely off of the vehicle. 

 

If your shop only quotes you pad and rotor replacement, this is a big RED FLAG!

It takes 38 new bolts, 2 seals, and topping off gear oil to properly replace the front and rear pads/rotors on a Transit. If you're unsure that your Transit's brakes were repaired properly, send us a copy of your invoice/estimate and we can let you know if the correct parts are listed. Email to Contact@PFMFleetService.com

Ford Transit - Front End Clunking Over Bumps

  • Typically around the 100,000 mile mark Transit owners may begin to notice more noise from the front suspension of their Transits. Here are the most common culprits-

  • Torn Control Arm Bushings - The control arm bushings are designed to isolate the control arms from the vehicles subframe. When these are torn it allows the control arms to hit the subframe causing a loud clunking over bumps that can usually be felt in the floorboard of the vehicle. 

  • Worn Stabilizer Links - These are used to reduce body roll in turns. When worn they will make a clunking sound. A good way to check for this is to swerve side to side (in a safe place) at low speeds to see if the vehicle clunks every time the body rolls from one side to the other during the swerve. 

  • Worn Struts - This will typically appear as several rapid clunks over each bump rather than a single clunk  and can typically be felt in the floorboard.

Ford Transit - Sliding Doors Sticking or Won't Close

  • With frequent use Transit owners may notice issues with the sliding doors either getting stuck or not closing. This is commonly caused from the door being forced shut with an object in the way or a person stepping on the lower door hinge getting in and out of the vehicle. 

  • Repair typically requires replacement of at least the upper hinge and often rear hinge and lower hinges as well. If the door has been operated out of alignment for a period of time this causes damage to the latch as well, which will also require replacement. 

Ford Transit - 10 Speed Transmission (Buyer Beware)

The Good - We're still trying to find it

The Bad - Ford first introduced the 10-speed transmission in the 2017 Ford F-150. Starting in 2020 the Ford Transits were equipped with the now notorious 10 speed automatic transmission technically known as the 10r80 transmission. This is a transmission that has been plagued with issues since its introduction. We have seen brand new Transits with under 100 miles have issues ranging from leaks to causing the vehicle to stall when placed in reverse. In our experience with these transmissions, very few have lived to see 100,000 miles. Frequent internal failures have lead to severe reliability concerns. Our best advice it to avoid purchasing a Ford Transit containing to 10 speed 10r80 transmission. 

Common Complaints

  • Erratic Shifting - Harsh, Delayed, Clunking, Binding, Stalling

  • Transmission Pump Drive Gear Failure (typically in diesel applications)

  • Torque Converter Clutch Failure

  • Transmission Warmer Failure - Coolant Leaks

What to do if you already own a 10r80 equipped for Ford Transit -

 

Our best advice is if you notice any of these concerns while the vehicle is under warranty, take it to the dealer immediately to have the concerns resolved before the factory powertrain warranty expires. Aside from having a shop perform transmission replacement or significant internal repairs there are not many things you can do as a Ford Transit owner to ease these concerns. Many of the problems are rooted in the new transmission fluid that is required for the 10r80 - Ford Motorcraft Mercon ULV (Ultra Low Viscosity). This fluid is extremely thin (hence the ULV designation), limiting the effectiveness of the protective film it is supposed to provide the internal transmission parts. We advise transmission fluid changes every 30,000 miles to help reduce lubrication failures from this ultra low viscosity fluid.